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Consumer Rates

Market

Informa Research Services, Inc.
Daily Rate Comparison

Informa Research Services, Inc.
Deposit Products Credit Unions Bank Average Difference
12 Month CD $10,000 0.49% 0.28% 0.21%
Personal Savings $1,000 0.20% 0.10% 0.10%
Personal Interest Checking $2,500 0.37% 0.15% 0.22%
NSF Fee $28.03 $30.69 $-2.66
Personal MMDA $2,500 0.17% 0.10% 0.07%
Business MMDA $2,500 0.17% 0.09% 0.08%

Consumer Loan Products Credit Unions Bank Average Difference
Unsecured Personal Loan - $5,000 - 4 Years 10.11% 10.18% -0.07%
New Auto Loan - 5 Years 2.61% 3.90% -1.29%
Used Auto Loan - 2 year Old - 4 Years 2.76% 4.05% -1.29%
HELOC - 80% LTV - $50,000 4.11% 4.37% -0.26%
HE Loan - 80% LTV - $50,000 - 15 Years 5.63% 5.90% -0.27%

Mortgage Loan Products Credit Unions Bank Average Difference
30 Year Fixed Conforming 3.66% 3.72% -0.06%
30 Year Fixed Jumbo 3.77% 3.85% -0.08%
5/1 Year ARM Conforming 2.96% 2.90% 0.06%

Credit Card Products Credit Unions Bank Average Difference
Platinum 8.85% 10.43% -1.58%
Annual Fee $25.00 $31.00 $-6.00
Maximum Late Fee $25.51 $31.75 $-6.24
Reward 10.10% 13.02% -2.92%
Annual Fee $28.50 $94.15 $-65.65
Maximum Late Fee $22.21 $33.02 $-10.81

Indirect Auto Loan Products Credit Unions Bank Average Difference
Indirect A Tier New Auto Loan - 5 Years 3.58% 3.63% -0.05%
Indirect B Tier New Auto Loan - 5 Years 5.29% 5.20% 0.09%
Indirect C Tier New Auto Loan - 5 Years 7.45% 6.65% 0.80%

Averages displayed are straight averages of all institutions within the Informa Research Services database for the selected region as of Wednesday, January 28, 2015. For detailed disclosures click here.

Other Resources

Business Rates

Market
Daily Financial Rates -- 2015-01-29

Financial Rates


Thursday, January 29, 2015

03:55 AM CST

TREASURY YIELD CURVE
(based on the $1 million market)

TermThu
1/29
Wed
1/28
Tue
1/27
Mon
1/26
Fri
1/23
1 month0.020.020.020.020.02
3 month0.020.020.030.020.03
6 month0.080.080.080.070.08
1 year0.170.170.180.170.17
2 year0.500.540.540.520.53
3 year0.810.870.890.860.90
5 year1.251.341.361.331.39
7 year1.531.621.641.621.69
10 year1.731.831.831.811.90
20 year2.052.152.142.122.21
30 year2.292.402.402.382.46

TREASURY BILLS

Results of the January 26, 2015 auction of short-term U.S. government bills, sold at a discount from face value in units of $10,000 to $ 1 million

TermLatest
Mon, 1/26
Week Ago
Tue, 1/20
13 weeks0.0200.025
26 weeks0.0750.075

PRIME RATE

3.25% Last changed December 16, 2008

FEDERAL FUNDS

TermThu
1/29
Wed
1/28
Tue
1/27
Mon
1/26
Fri
1/23
high0.3120.2500.3120.3120.312
low0.0500.0800.0500.0300.030
near closing bid0.0900.0000.1000.0600.050
offered0.1100.2700.1300.2700.100
effective rate20.1300.1200.1400.1300.130

FREDDIE MAC (Mortgage commitments, 30 days)

TermThu
1/29
Wed
1/28
Tue
1/27
Mon
1/26
Fri
1/23
30 year0.000.000.000.000.00

FANNIE MAE (Mortgage commitments, 30 days)

TermThu
1/29
Wed
1/28
Tue
1/27
Mon
1/26
Fri
1/23
30 year3.2003.1893.1853.2183.258

LIBOR

TermThu
1/29
Wed
1/28
Tue
1/27
Mon
1/26
Fri
1/23
1 month0.239000.239000.236000.234000.23300
3 month0.384000.386000.387000.385000.38400
6 month0.539000.539000.539000.538000.53900
1 year0.839000.839000.839000.839000.84000

COMMERCIAL PAPER (Financial, 90 days)

TermWeek ended
1/27
Week ended
1/21
90 days0.230.23

NA: Data not available at time of page generation (shown at top of page)

Sources:
Wall Street Journal
U.S. Dept. of the Treasury


All rates are from the previous business day unless otherwise noted.

Other Resources

FOMC still in holding pattern on Fed funds rate

Market
WASHINGTON (1/29/15)--Given the opposing forces of a strengthening job market and weakening inflation, the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) Wednesday made no substantial changes to forward guidance on when it will raise short-term interest rates from their near-zero levels.

Mimicking the refrain seen in its last policy statement, the FOMC said policy accommodation may be appropriate for "some time" once employment and inflation reach their mandate-consistent levels.

The Fed also reiterated that it will take a patient approach to making the decision on when to hike interest rates. Many expect the FOMC will not begin to raise rates until mid-2015, or later.

"The FOMC's decision to keep the federal funds rate at its current 0% to 0.25% target is not surprising given the low inflation rate, which is anticipated to decline further," said Perc Pineda, senior economist for the Credit Union National Association.

"One thing is definite: The decision of the Federal Reserve to keep the federal funds rate unchanged means that the squeeze on net-interest margin, which could be experienced by credit unions when short-term interest rates rise, is postponed for now," Pineda added.

While the FOMC did not mention the global economy, which has stagnated of late, much attention in the policy statement was paid to inflation and its recent struggles.

The Fed, which noted it continues to monitor inflation closely, expects inflation to continue to decline in the near term, but to rise gradually towards 2% in the medium term.

The FOMC sees the labor market, on the other hand, trending in the right direction, which could ultimately dictate when the Fed raises interest rates.

"This year is going to be another positive year for the U.S. economy, and at some point the federal funds rate will rise," Pineda said. "Since monetary policy has lags, it makes perfect sense to increase interest rates at some point sooner than later. The timing, however, depends on where inflation and unemployment rates are heading. So far, the Federal Reserve has done a good job keeping its fingers on the pulse of the U.S. economy."

Other Resources

News of the Competition (1/29/15)

Market
  • WASHINGTON (1/29/15)--In the wake of the financial crisis that toppled the U.S. economy in 2008, federal lawmakers targeted the big banks that were largely responsible for the crash with regulations they hoped would prevent future financial catastrophe. But a recent study has found that banks continue to be as complex as ever, potentially keeping the threat of economic upheaval very much alive ( MarketWatch Jan. 28). "The complex structure and opaque connections among (the banks) impeded oversight and market discipline before the crisis and greatly complicated crisis management," the study from the Systemic Risk Council found. The study examined 29 banks deemed "globally systemically important" by the Financial Stability Board. Specifically, it looked at the subsidiaries of these massive financial institutions and found that the banks had an average of 1,002 majority-owned subsidiaries , according to MarketWatch . The study also found that banks had 2.6 times more subsidiaries than non-financial institutions with similar market capitalization, with an average of 60% of those subsidiaries found outside the institution's home country ...

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