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Consumer Archive

Consumer

Expert gives tips to devise down-payment plan

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WASHINGTON (8/1/08)--This Sunday, H&FF Radio guest Tracy Ashfield outlines the key steps necessary for accomplishing down-payment goals, while other guests explore the pros and cons of index funds, no-interest deals at retail stores, and an unconventional yet high-tech way to find surcharge-free ATMs. Home & Family Finance airs Sundays at 3 p.m. EDT on the Radio America Network. The one-hour program devoted to consumer finance issues is brought to you by America's credit unions and their 90 million members, and is presented by CO-OP Network. The Credit Union National Association (CUNA) and Radio America are podcasting Home & Family Finance through iTunes, Podcast Alley, Odeo, and other popular podcast library sites, as well as on Radio America and CUNA’s Web sites. Sunday’s show, which you also can hear later via the Internet, features Paul Berry, Washington, D.C., journalist and broadcaster, discussing these topics with special guests:
* “Use Text Messaging to Find a Surcharge-Free ATM,” with Eric Porter, CO-Op Network, Ontario, Calif.; * “Index Funds,” with Tom Ruggie; president, Ruggie Wealth Management, Tavares, Fla.; * “Devise a Down-Payment Plan,” with Tracy Ashfield, executive vice president, Strategic Mortgage Solutions, Madison, Wis.; * “No-Interest Deals at Stores,” with Gail Hillebrand, staff attorney, Consumers Union, San Francisco; and * Host Paul Berry Answers Your Questions.
Home & Family Finance is a resource center for personal finance information at CUNA. The radio show is sponsored by CO-OP Network, the national credit union ATM network; Cabot Creamery Cooperative, maker of award-winning cheddar; Visa; and Western Corporate FCU and its member credit unions. For more information, read “House Shopping: Devise a Down-Payment Plan,” in Home & Family Resource Center.

Social Security launches streamlined benefits calculator

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WASHINGTON (7/30/08)--Retirement planning just got a little easier. Last week the Social Security Administration unveiled a new online retirement estimator providing users with a more accurate estimate of benefits, particularly for those nearing retirement age (Social Security Administration.gov July 21). The new calculator has several enhancements:
* Speed. The new calculator is tied directly to your Social Security earnings record. This means you don’t have to manually enter in years of earnings data. * Accuracy. The closer you are to retirement age, the more accurate this estimate will be. The old paper statements assume your salary stays the same until you retire, which is unrealistic for most people, resulting in less accurate estimates (Boston.com July 23). * Multiple estimates. You can print out up to three different estimates at one time for comparison. For example, view retirement benefits for retirement at ages 62, 66, and 70. * Security. The new calculator doesn’t display your earnings record information used to calculated the final benefits estimate, nor does it display any personal information such as address, earnings, or other information that could lead to identity theft.
Stay tuned. This fall the Social Security Administration plans to introduce its next initiative: a total overhaul of its online retirement application. Expect the average filing time to decrease significantly from 45 minutes to about 15 minutes. For more information, read “Can You Count on Social Security?” in Plan It: Retire Ready Toolkit.

New tax deadlines for disaster victims stimulus payment

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WASHINGTON (7/28/08)--Disaster victims in seven states have until Aug. 29 to meet certain tax requirements, and persons who qualify but haven’t yet filed for their 2008 stimulus payment have until Oct. 15 (IRS.gov July 14 and 18). Here are the specifics:
* Disaster victims. Victims who reside in counties declared presidential disaster areas in Indiana, Iowa, Illinois, Missouri, Nebraska, West Virginia, and Wisconsin have more time--until Aug. 29--to file certain tax returns and to make certain tax payments. For more information for your state, visit irs.gov and search “disaster Aug. 29”; * Stimulus payment. More than five million people--retirees, disabled veterans and low-wage workers who normally don’t file a tax return--haven’t filed for an economic stimulus check, even though they’re eligible (USA Today June 23). To get the stimulus payment, however, you must file a tax return. It’s not too late. File your 2007 tax return by Oct. 15 if you have at least $3,000 in qualifying income, which includes any combination of earned income, nontaxable combat pay, and certain payments from Social Security, Veterans Affairs, and Railroad Retirement. For more information, visit irs.gov and type “stimulus payments it’s not too late” in the search box.
For more information, read “Compile Your Financial Notebook” in Plan It: Retire Ready Toolkit.

HandFF Radio guest explains todays credit crisis

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WASHINGTON (7/25/08)--One of Sunday’s H&FF Radio Show’s guests explains how we got into the current credit crisis, how it’s affected us as well as the credit card industry, and what steps we should take to dig out. Home & Family Finance airs Sundays at 3 p.m. EDT on the Radio America Network. The one-hour program devoted to consumer finance issues is brought to you by America's credit unions and their 90 million members, and is presented by CO-OP Network. The Credit Union National Association (CUNA) and Radio America are podcasting Home & Family Finance through iTunes, Podcast Alley, Odeo, and other popular podcast library sites, as well as on Radio America and CUNA’s Web sites. Sunday’s show, which you also can hear later via the Internet, features Paul Berry, Washington, D.C., journalist and broadcaster, discussing these topics with special guests:
* “Navigating the Veterans’ Benefits Maze,” with Shad Meshad, founder and president, National Veteran’s Foundation, Los Angeles; * “Investment Scams Targeting Baby Boomers’ Retirement Catch-Up Savings,” with Kelly Campbell, president/CEO, Campbell Wealth Management, Fairfax, Va.; * “Today’s Credit Crisis,” with Brad Stroh, founder and co-CEO, Bills.com and Freedom Financial Network, San Mateo, Calif.; * “Questions You Should Ask When Choosing a Credit or Debt Counselor,” with Sara Gottovi, staff attorney, Federal Trade Commission’s Division of Financial Practices, Bureau of Consumer Protection, Washington, D.C.; and * Host Paul Berry Answers Your Questions: The euro, auto dealership charges, today’s complex consumer marketplace, and how to start investing.
Home & Family Finance is a resource center for personal finance information at CUNA. The radio show is sponsored by CO-OP Network, the national credit union ATM network; Cabot Creamery Cooperative, maker of award-winning cheddar; Visa; and Western Corporate FCU and its member credit unions. For more information read “Tough Times Series: Services, Sites Help Veterans Navigate Benefits Maze,” in Home & Family Resource Center.

Confusing world of credit scores--made simpler

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NEW YORK (7/23/08)--A recent study, jointly conducted by the Consumer Federation of America and Washington Mutual Bank, revealed that although knowledge of credit scores has improved slightly among consumers, many still remain misinformed and confused. Why? Not all credit scores are created equal (SmartMoney.com July 10). According to the study, 31% of consumers knew that lenders use credit scores to assess risk, 21% said they thought the score represents their financial resources to repay loans, and 41% didn’t know that using a credit card’s entire limit lowers their score. Many consumers believed marital status, residency, and education were factors in their credit score. Your credit score--that three-digit number summarizing your credit history--is a critical factor in a lender’s decision to grant you credit and at what rate. While lenders are the primary users of credit scores, some employers, landlords and insurance companies also use them to evaluate applicants. Therein lies the problem. If you purchase your credit score from Fair Isaac Corp. at FICO.com, you get a FICO Score. If you request a free TransUnion or Experian credit report from annualcreditreport.com and also purchase your credit score from that website, however, you’ll get a VantageScore. And if you use any of these sites--experian.com, freecreditreport.com, consumerinfo.com, creditexpert.com, or familysecure.com--you’ll get a PLUS Score, which typically isn’t used by lenders (SmartMoney.com May 1). If you’re not confused yet, try this: Each of these credit scores has a different numbering system, which means a score of 800 from FICO is considered very good, while the same score from VantageScore would be considered a grade equivalent to a “C.” If you can’t remember all that, then remember this: Most mortgage lenders use the FICO Score. The best advice, then, is to ask your lender which credit score it uses to determine your creditworthiness. Also, a clean credit history will boost all your credit scores. Before you apply for credit, take steps to clean up your credit report:
* Pay all bills on time; * Keep each account balance at less than 25% of your available credit limit; * Don’t close old accounts--or open a flurry of new accounts--right before you apply for credit; and * Don’t co-sign for another person with bad--or no--credit.
For more information, read “Tough Times Series: Credit Savvy Is Key to Avoiding Costly Missteps” in Home & Family Resource Center.

Your credit union accounts are safe insured

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MADISON, Wis. (7/21/08)—Credit unions remain a safe harbor for your savings and other accounts, despite economic woes, including the recent IndyMac bank failure. Thanks to federal insurance—members’ shares are backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Treasury (CUNA Center for Personal Finance). There’s no better time to be a credit union member. Virtually all credit unions are insured by the National Credit Union Share Insurance Fund (NCUSIF), which insures savings of at least up to $100,000 per account. Certain retirement accounts such as IRAs and Keoghs benefit from additional coverage of up to $250,000. For the fewer than 170 credit unions with private deposit insurance, their equity ratio typically is even higher than the federal fund, and state regulators oversee these privately insured credit unions. NCUSIF’s equity-to-insured deposits are estimated at a strong 1.24% as of June 30 and projected to increase to 1.28% by year-end, according to the National Credit Union Administration (NCUA). Credit unions are nationally recognized for having steered clear of the subprime mortgage mess by lending responsibly and holding more of their mortgage loans—roughly 70%—in their portfolios instead of selling them on the secondary market to beleaguered Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Also, credit unions have a better capital-to-asset ratio—11.1% compared with 10% for banks. What does share insurance coverage mean for you?
* If you have more than one single-ownership account in the same credit union, all those account balances are added together and insured in the aggregate, to the maximum of $100,000. * If you have a joint account at the same credit union, that account is insured separately from your individual account up to the $100,000 level, provided each of you has personally signed an account signature card and each of you has a right of withdrawal on the same basis. Each individual’s interests in all jointly held accounts are added together and insured up to $100,000; * If you have accounts at more than one insured credit union, you have coverage up to the full insurable amount in each credit union. If your credit union has one or more branches, the main office and all branch offices are considered as one credit union; * If you have a revocable trust account, such as payable-on-death, living trust, or testamentary account, insurance coverage for each account is up to $100,000 per owner for each qualified beneficiary; and * While IRAs and Keogh accounts are insured separately from nonretirement funds, with each type insured up to $250,000, funds in traditional IRAs and Roth IRAs are added together and insured in the aggregate up to $250,000. Coverdell Education Savings Accounts are treated as irrevocable trust accounts and added in with your other irrevocable trust account funds and insured separately up to $100,000.
Bottom line: Depending on how your accounts are established, funds in a federally insured credit union can be insured to a level much higher than $100,000. For more information about the specifics of your insurance coverage, visit with the professionals at the credit union. For more information, read, “Credit Union … Bank … What’s the Difference?” in Home & Family Resource Center.

HandFF Radio guest explains shared branching benefits

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WASHINGTON (7/18/08)--Recent natural disasters have left many victims not only homeless, but clueless as to how to manage day-to-day finances. These and other scenarios represent the opportunity for--and benefits of--shared branching, and one of Sunday’s H&FF Radio show guests explains how. Home & Family Finance airs Sundays at 3 p.m. EDT on the Radio America Network. The one-hour program devoted to consumer finance issues is brought to you by America's credit unions and their 90 million members, and is presented by CO-OP Network. The Credit Union National Association (CUNA) and Radio America are podcasting Home & Family Finance through iTunes, Podcast Alley, Odeo, and other popular podcast library sites, as well as on Radio America and CUNA’s Web sites. Sunday’s show, which you also can hear later via the Internet, features Paul Berry, Washington, D.C., journalist and broadcaster, discussing these topics with special guests:
* “Put Low-Cost Fresh Veggies on Your Table: Listener Best Money Management Tip,” with Susan Tiffany, director of personal finance information for adults, CUNA's Center for Personal Finance, Madison, Wis.; * “Investing for Retirement? Don’t Forget to Replenish Your Portfolio With Its Returns,” with Eric Sheerin, financial adviser and registered financial consultant, Barber Financial Group, Lenexa, Kan.; * “What is Shared Branching?” with Craig Beach, senior vice president marketing and business development, Co-op Shared Branching, Duluth, Ga.; * Seven Questions to Ask Before Buying a Condo or Co-Op Insurance Policy,” with Ethan Ewing, president, Bills.com, San Mateo, Calif.; and * Host Paul Berry Answers Your Questions: Credit card loss protection insurance, reducing debt quickly, home equity loans with no closing costs, rent-to-own.
Home & Family Finance is a resource center for personal finance information at CUNA. The radio show is sponsored by CO-OP Network, the national credit union ATM network; Cabot Creamery Cooperative, maker of award-winning cheddar; Visa; and Western Corporate FCU and its member credit unions. For more information, read, “401(k) Fees: Know What You're Paying, What You're Getting,” in Home & Family Resource Center.

Avoid decimal point blues when paying bills online

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WASHINGTON (7/16/08)--An easy way to “go green” with finances is to pay bills online. But you quickly can wipe out the benefits of online bill payment if you accidentally ditch the decimal point, add zeros when you don’t have to, or neglect to take adequate precautions with your private information (AARP Magazine July/August 2008). Online bill-pay clearly is safer than receiving paper statements and sending paper checks via snail mail--crooks can heist account numbers from mailed credit card bills, steal Social Security numbers from unsecured documents, or run off with incoming mail from unlocked mailboxes. Or, your payment could be misdirected or lost altogether. Good advice: Don’t type “00” to indicate "no cents." If you accidentally misplace the decimal point when entering the amount, and have used the 00s, you may unwittingly authorize a payment 100 times the intended amount. You need only enter the whole dollars, for example, $68, not $68.00. Some software automatically will fill in the cents columns for you. If you use online banking to pay your bills, be aware of some simple do’s and don’ts:
* Do install a firewall. Visit download.com for software reviews and downloads. * Do use caution with automated payments. AARP recommends using automated payments only for mortgage payments or savings plans--typically those with consistent payment amounts over time. * Do check your budget often. Will you have sufficient funds in your account by the payment date? * Do a double-take. Log back in later and make sure the payments were sent and processed correctly. * Don’t click "Send" too quickly. Is the decimal point in the right place? Did you type the amount correctly? * Don’t forget to log out. Avoid public computers for any type of financial activity, and never use the “Remember my password” option--even at home. * Don’t hand over personal information. If you’re asked for personal information in an e-mail message or over the phone, that’s a red flag. Hit delete or hang up. And remember, your credit union would never call to ask you this type of information; it already has the information on file.

Discard your electronics without compromising your ID

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MADISON, Wis. (7/14/08)--When discarding computerized electronics, such as PDAs (personal digital assistants), cell phones, and computers, you may be setting yourself up as an identity theft victim by improperly erasing--or not erasing at all--your personal information from the device, says the Credit Union National Association's center for personal finance. Deleting data via the computer’s recycling bin erases only the record of the file, not the data the file points to. With the right tools, the “deleted” data still is retrievable. Similarly, erasing data on cell phones or PDAs by resetting them--or using the “clear” option on the interface--leaves private information stored in flash memory and available for thieves, according to the website of Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Information Services and Technology (IS&T), Cambridge, Mass. Identity theft is a steadily growing crime and can cost victims endless hours and dollars trying to salvage their credit and clear their name. However, you can protect yourself. IS&T suggests several ways to wipe out personal data when selling or recycling old equipment. For mobile devices:
* Reset the device. Consult the user’s manual or manufacturer’s website for advice, or visit Wireless Recycling at recellular.com/recycling/data_eraser/ for other helpful information; * If your phone has a SIM card, remove it. These portable memory chips carry potentially harmful personal information; and * Follow manufacturer’s guidelines for properly erasing private data from USB drives or iPods.
For computers:
* Be sure to completely erase the hard drive (so it’s “wiped”)--either hire someone or do it yourself; and * For do-it-yourselfers, check out Software Options at web.mit.edu/ist/topics/security/media_sanitizing.html#4 for tools that meet government security standards, and then permanently erase all data from your hard drive.
Companies such as Green Disk safely recycle and dispose of a variety of electronic devices--cell phones, computers, PDAs, CDs, and much more. Finally, consider physically destroying an item if you’re not sure about the safety of your personal information.

Discarding electronics may be hazardous to your ID

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WASHINGTON (7/11/08)--If you carelessly dispose of your personal digital assistant (PDA), cell phone, or computer, you could be handing over personal information to the new “owners” of your discarded or recycled equipment, according to one of the guests on Sunday’s H&FF Radio show. Home & Family Finance airs Sundays at 3 p.m. EDT on the Radio America Network. The one-hour program devoted to consumer finance issues is brought to you by America's credit unions and their 90 million members, and is presented by CO-OP Network. The Credit Union National Association (CUNA) and Radio America are podcasting Home & Family Finance through iTunes, Podcast Alley, Odeo, and other popular podcast library sites, as well as on Radio America and CUNA’s websites. Home & Family Finance Radio welcomes XEPE AM 1700 in San Diego, which is now airing the show each Sunday at 3 p.m. PT, beginning June 29. Sunday’s show, which you also can hear later via the Internet, features Paul Berry, Washington, D.C., journalist and broadcaster, discussing these topics with special guests:
* “Gadgets That Help You Use and Conserve Water Wisely,” with Stacy Bass, utilities department public relations officer, and manager of education and outreach programs, Mesa, Ariz.; * “Saving for College,” with Jason Alderman, director, issues management, Visa USA, San Francisco, Calif.; * “The Secrets of Money: A Guide for Everyone on Practical Financial Literacy,” with Braun Mincher, entrepreneur and author, Fort Collins, Colo.; * “Identity Theft and Safely Discarding Your Personal Electronic Equipment,” with Jim Stickley, founder, chief technical officer, and vice president of engineering, TraceSecurity, San Diego, Calif.; and * Host Paul Berry Answers Your Questions: Simple ways to save gas, ladder certificates of deposit, and select a credit counselor.
Home & Family Finance is a resource center for personal finance information at CUNA. The radio show is sponsored by CO-OP Network, the national credit union ATM network; Cabot Creamery Cooperative, maker of award-winning cheddar; Visa; and Western Corporate FCU and its member credit unions. For more information, read “Identity Theft: Getting Back to Square One” in Home & Family Resource Center.

Simple steps can avoid costly moving scams

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NORTH PALM BEACH, Fla. (7/9/08)--Moving company scams are on the rise, with more than $1.2 million in federal fines issued by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Association (FMCSA) in 2007. Knowing how to protect yourself before a big move could save you thousands of dollars and a lot of added stress (Bankrate.com June 27). Common scams involve movers demanding more money before they’ll deliver your possessions to your new home--after you’ve already paid more than the estimate they gave you. Many variations on the moving scam theme exist, but you can take a few simple steps to help protect yourself before, during, and after a move.
*Get recommendations. The best way to find a reputable mover is to ask friends, family, or your real estate agent. *Do your research. Check with the Better Business Bureau to see if any complaints have been filed against the company. MovingScam.com keeps a list of more than 350 blacklisted movers. And make sure the moving company is registered with FMCSA at protectyourmove.gov. *Get at least three on-site estimates. A telltale sign of a scam is when movers don’t offer an on-site inspection. Get a written estimate signed by the mover after the estimator has seen what you want moved. Each estimate should clearly describe all charges for services the mover provides. *Ask about the claims process. Even good movers can scratch your furniture or drop a fragile box, so it’s important the mover has a clear claims process so you can recover from the damage. *Make sure your contract covers everything. A reputable mover won’t hide charges--like a driver’s fee or extra fees for pads and packing--in the contract. *Look at the moving trucks. Are they well-kept and clean? Will a company-owned truck--rather than a rental--arrive on moving day? Rented vehicles can be a red flag for rogue movers, according to FMCSA.
On the big day, make sure you’re around when the movers arrive so you can answer questions and give directions. If something goes wrong, file a complaint at protectyourmove.gov or call 888-DOT-SAFT (888-368-7328) Monday through Friday between 9 a.m. and 9 p.m. EST. For more information, listen to “No Hassles Moving Company Guide” in Home & Family Resource Center.

New online courses benefit small biz owners

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WASHINGTON (7/7/08)—To aid small business owners with the basics of finance and borrowing, the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) launched two new online resources last month on loan guaranty programs and loan package preparation (U.S. Small Business Administration June 26). Independent businesses with fewer than 500 workers have created 60% to 80% of new jobs annually over the past decade and represent 99.7% of all employer firms, according to the Small Business Administration (SBA). The significance of small business on the economy is evident in these statistics, and the SBA and similar outlets provide resources to assist them with their endeavors. The two new self-paced tutorials, Finance Primer: Guide to SBA’s Loan Guaranty Programs and How to Prepare a Loan Package, appear on the administration’s Web site and are available free to anyone registering at sba.gov/services/training/newcourses/index.html. The finance primer course identifies the most frequently used sources of capital by small businesses, reviews basic finance philosophy, and illustrates SBA’s loan guaranty programs. The loan package course covers how to prepare a loan package for a lender, how a lender will assess a loan request, and how entrepreneurs can avoid common financial mistakes such as securing the wrong type of financing or underestimating the cost of borrowing money. Both tutorials provide information about supplemental resources for small business owners and help entrepreneurs develop economic independence and become more financially savvy. Course participants completing the 30-minute online training receive completion certificates from the SBA. Go to sba.gov for additional resources for small businesses. For more information, read, “Small Business: Analyze the Numbers,” in Plan It: Retire Ready Toolkit.

HandFF Radio guest Assemble your disaster grab n go box

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WASHINGTON (7/3/08)--If a natural disaster strikes your community, can you lay your hands on items critical to your survival and move to safety within a few minutes? If not, one of the guests on this week’s H&FF Radio show talks about disaster preparedness and what you should have in your grab ‘n’ go box. Home & Family Finance airs Sundays at 3 p.m. EDT on the Radio America Network. The one-hour program devoted to consumer finance issues is brought to you by America's credit unions and their 90 million members, and is presented by CO-OP Network. The Credit Union National Association (CUNA) and Radio America are podcasting Home & Family Finance through iTunes, Podcast Alley, Odeo, and other popular podcast library sites, as well as on Radio America and CUNA’s Web sites. Sunday’s show, which you also can hear later via the Internet, features Paul Berry, Washington, D.C., journalist and broadcaster, discussing these topics with special guests:
* “How to Avoid Common Mistakes Most Investors Make,” with Paul Merriman, founder and director of Merriman Berkman Next, Seattle, Wash.; * “Divided We Fail,” with Lisa Davis, attorney and director of public education, AARP, Washington, D.C.; * “Estate Planning” with Mary Randolph, vice president of editorial, NOLO, Berkeley, Calif.; * “Disaster Preparedness,” with Joyce Cavanagh, associate professor and extension family economics specialist, Texas Cooperative Extension, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas; and * Listener Q & A: Appealing property tax assessments; online shopping; private mortgage insurance--is it deductible?
Home & Family Finance is a resource center for personal finance information at CUNA. The radio show is sponsored by CO-OP Network, the national credit union ATM network; Cabot Creamery Cooperative, maker of award-winning cheddar; Visa; and Western Corporate FCU and its member credit unions. For more information, read, “Patient Advocates Are on Your Side,” in Home & Family Resource Center.

It pays to negotiate

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YONKERS, N.Y. (7/2/08)--It’s not uncommon to drive a few extra blocks to save a few cents on gas, but most American consumers still aren’t going the extra mile to save hundreds of dollars by negotiating on big purchases (ShopSmartMag.org June/July 2008). Negotiating is a little more work, but it can be well worth the extra effort. A Consumer Reports National Research Center survey showed the majority of consumers who negotiated prices on appliances, electronics, or furniture got at least one discount in the past three years. Yet 40% of survey respondents admitted they rarely even attempt to negotiate (ConsumerReports.org). How do negotiating shoppers land a bargain? They come to the store prepared, they aren’t afraid to ask questions, and they know that the first price they see doesn’t always have to be the final price. Try these negotiating tips, even if you’re an inexperienced bargainer:
*Do your research. The Internet makes it easy to find the going price for just about anything--a new dinner table, a laptop, or the latest digital camera. Check out shopzilla.com or pricegrabber.com before you head to the store. If you find a competitor’s price in a newspaper ad, bring a copy of the ad with you to the store. *Always ask. If you’re remodeling your kitchen, ask about a volume discount if you buy more than two appliances. Before you hand over your money, ask if there’s an impending sale. *Try for a break on extras. If the salesperson insists the price can’t be lowered, ask for a deal on extras like delivery, installation, or a warranty. *Bring cash. If you can offer payment on the spot, the salesperson will be more likely to cut you a deal. *Take your time. Unless you need that refrigerator today, it’s probably best to return to the store more than once. You don’t have to be in a hurry to make a big purchase; a good salesperson will understand that and will want to be there when you’re ready to close the deal.
For more information, use, “Calculator: What It’s Worth to Cut Back My Spending,” in Home & Family Resource Center.